Ethereal Edition: A Prayer for Those Who Care for People on the Fringe

Tomorrow will be my last day of training at my new job, as well as doubling as an orientation for the actual site I’ll be working at.  I’ll be working with adults who grew up with IDDs of various sorts (Intellectual Developmental Disorders), and helping them care for themselves while encouraging them to take an active role in their own well being.  This appeals to me on a number of levels, both personal and spiritual, and I’ve been looking forward to it for a while.

The spiritual parallels should be easy for most to see; worshipers of Loki and Sigyn have often drawn parallels between their deities and people with mental health issues, as well as those who have been marginalized by society.  Those with such disabilities count strongly in both categories.  There are connections
to the medicinal care-taking personified by Eir as well.

What follows is a prayer I wrote for this new job.  This isn’t just a way to make money for my family; this a way to make money for my family while making the world a better place in the same breath.  I want to embrace this new career to it’s fullest, and the guidance of the Gods and the Goddesses would be invaluable.


Fire’s Trickster and Champion of Ingenuity
Victory’s Lady and Suffering’s Mother
Divinity’s Doctor and Council to the Muddled
I ask for your wisdom, your eyes, and your ears.

Today I will go where the sick are plentiful,
Where the pain is palpable,
And their place forgettable.
I will care for those who,
have been tossed to the mire.
Not for crimes,
But for the pain born by them,
Simply from the act of birth.

Maligned for their existing.
Shunned for their nature.

May it be that I can bring laughter to the joyless,
Serenity to the wild-hearted,
And recovery to the incurable.
May your hands and voices be there to guide me,
When a map cannot be found,
And there is no star to direct my way.

Loki, creator of strength within strife.
Sigyn, serenity and compassion within tragedy.
Eir, greatest physician of the Aesir

Please guide me as I go about my day,
And help me see my charges,
Through your eyes,
And know them through your ways.

Hail the Gods and their Allies!
Hail the Ancestors and their Descendants!
Hail the Folk and their Friends!

Soft-Racism, Meta-Folkism, and Heathenry

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Grab a seat folks; this one is NOT a quick read.

Jon Stewart once quipped that “…we have made enormous progress in teaching everyone that racism is bad.  Where we seemed to have dropped the ball is in teaching people what racism is…”.  While Stewart was making light of the news of the day (and a bunch of KKK members who were trying to say they weren’t racist with a strait face), it’s my opinion that he touched on something important; many in society seem to be unable to see what racism actually is, even as they’ll state that they want nothing to do with it.

Which doesn’t work because you can’t denounce that which you cannot identify.  For all of our collective distaste for Klansmen, Neo-Nazis, and vocal bigotry, we seem to have missed the fact that racism is more than such idiocy.    Oh, that idiocy is part of the problem…but they’re only the smallest part.  Vocal, abrasive, and violent, but still relatively few in number.  Today, I’m going to be talking about some of the subtler influences, and why some people object to them as loudly as they do.

If we are going to meaningfully talk about how this problem manifests with the Heathen religion, however, we first need to identify what it is, where it comes from, and how those beliefs are codified.  For the most part, I see the majority of soft-racist ideology being born from a fusion of Folkish philosophy and the theories purposed by Metagenetics as written by Stephen McNallen.*

I am going to state this now so there is no confusion or misunderstanding; I am in no way saying or implying that  everyone who identifies themselves as a “Folkish Heathen” is a racist.  Certainly there are some who fit that description, but words like “Folkish”, “Universalist”, “Tribalist”, and “Lokean” have no firm definition.  When it comes to “Folkish” there is a huge degree of variance; in one conversation it’s used to talk about White supremacy organizations…the next it’ll be used to talk about ancestor worship, regardless of culture.  Now, I will say that the vast majority of people who utilize racist practices also describe themselves as Folkish, which definitely contributes to the confusion here.  So we need to split those who are Folkish and reject a racist interpretation from those who are advocating one if we wish to talk about the issue with clarity.

Where I believe the racist side of Heathenry starts, and perhaps even ends, is with the aforementioned Metagenetics.  The stances that the document contains often form up the back bone of many racialist and segregated stances.  So, for all intents and purposes we have a combination of a fixation upon ancestry, such that it trumps many other spiritual considerations, and the philosophical/theological mandates put forth in Metagenetics.  For simplicity’s sake, I have taken to calling this ideology “Meta-Folkism”.  When I use this term, I am only describing those who both embrace the descriptor of “Folkish” and combine it with the segregated stances which Metagenetics advocates.

So now that we have explained what we are and are not talking about, lets address the potential and obvious elephants in the rooms.  In the process, we’ll uncover a lot of the problems at hand.

How is Meta-Folkism/Metagenetics inherently racist?  Metagenetics says that ethnic religions should only be practiced by people of that ethnicity…so isn’t that just religious equality and cultural awareness?  Wouldn’t the opposite be cultural appropriation, which is bad?

Metagenetics  states “that there are spiritual and metaphysical implications to heredity, and that we [Asatruar] are thus a religion not for all of humanity, but rather one that calls only its own.” and that “[Asatruar] are intimately tied up with the fate of our whole people, for Asatru is an expression of the soul of our race.”  This is the engine of the philosophy, and the entire document is written with the aim of proving these central conceits.  Metagenetics wants very desperately to present itself as a scientific document, and even calls itself out as a type of science.  The problem is that what is expressed within that text doesn’t actually do anything of the sort.

It tries to use  the work three psychologists (Carl Jung, Timothy Leary, and Daniel Freedman), a Danish scientist studying reincarnation (Dr. Ian Stevenson), a Botanist/Parapsychologist (Dr. Joseph Banks Rhine), and a brain specialist (Dr. Jule-Nielson) in order to give the reader proof of it’s validity.  Putting to the side that some of the experts the author references are extremely questionable or represent the fringe of their accepted fields**, we also have a theory concerning genetics that doesn’t contain any reference to the findings of an actual geneticist.  The lack of such a reference or resource is crippling to the legitimacy of a theory which expresses opinions on how genetics and religion interact.; tangentially connected concepts and ideas from disparate fields can not fill in that sort of gap.  This weakness is compounded when you realize that the number of references that remain are few small in number.  You can’t make am compelling case for something like this with five pages, six sources, and a reference to a single myth from one tribe of Aboriginal Americans.

As such, Metagenetics being labeled as a scientific theory is inaccurate.  To be plain about it, it’s nothing more or less than a form of Unverified Personal Gnosis or UPG.  It represents nothing but the writer’s personal theories on the way that genetics and spirituality interact.  It is supported by sources that the writer agrees with, but is not contrasted against any research or studies that threatens its platform.  The document was not subjected to peer review, and doesn’t use research from the realm of study within which it is based to help prove it’s suppositions.  It’s just a spiritual informed philosophy, and nothing but.

Once we take it from science to philosophy, we can dig deeper into Metagenetics (and the Meta-Folkism it inspires) and start really looking at it’s fundamental problems.  It posits that meaningful religious practice is not only improved by genetic similarity, but that it is outright required.  If we look in the World English Dictionary, we see that one of the definitions of racism is “the belief that races have distinctive cultural characteristics determined by hereditary factors and that this endows some races with an intrinsic superiority over others “.  Intrinsic superiority can be situational, and such superiority is a core element within Meta-Folkish thought; those with certain genetic profiles have a right to Asatru, and those without them do not.

When some of us call Meta-Folkism and Metagenetics racist, the literal definition of racism is on our side.  The moment you declare that you have the right to something and another person does not, and you claim that form of superiority based on your racial background, you’ve fallen into racism by definition.  I know that many Meta-Folkists say that it goes both ways; that those of predominantly European backgrounds have no business practicing spiritual traditions that are not the domain of their ancestors.  This would seem to level the playing field at first glance, but it fails on a very basic level.

It doesn’t matter if you bestow the same inequality to another ethnicity; separate but equal failed to be a good thing when it was applied to schools, bus seats, and restrooms in the segregated South.   In the history of the world, I doubt that anyone can come up with an example of when a contentious and problematic social model was improved by bringing a religious mandate into the picture.  Many try to defend this platform by bringing up the blood and heritage standards of the various Aboriginal American tribes…..forgetting that those standards were not established by the tribes themselves.  Contrary to popular understanding, they were imposed upon them by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.  These standards are, to the best of my knowledge, not something that was requested by the Aboriginal Americans themselves.

Well, isn’t a racialist stance harmless as long as it is utilized without hatred?  Is it truly a problem as long as everyone has something for themselves?  I’m not going out and burning crosses or lynching people; those are the actions of “real” hate!

On the surface, racialist stances like Meta-Folkism can seem relatively benign; no one is advocating violence against anyone else. People say that, while the definition of racism is met, the spirit of hatred and spite is not.  Proclaiming a superior position within a given religion indicates no hate or antipathy when a similarly equal position is granted to another, and no one is trying to subjugate anyone to another person’s will.  Advocates of Meta-Folkism will say that this is the reason that claims of racism are completely blown out of proportion.

This can seem quite sensible, until you realize something very basic: these apologists are not the ones being denied anything.  It is very easy to rationalize  and pretend that a policy of soft-racism is somehow morally superior to one crafted from more bitter and aggressive emotions.  That blamelessness has a hard time standing tall, however, when you realize that you are passing judgement on people who are “different” and no one else.  You’re establishing equality almost as an afterthought; declaring something you didn’t want in the first place as something reserved for someone else.  Parallels to reservations for Aboriginal Americans should not go missed; it’s the same sort of thinking, simply keyed on a spiritual scale.

Equality means equal; it requires no counter balance to be achieved.  Human beings are not math equations, and putting an equal modifier on both sides doesn’t necessarily mean things become fair.  Religion, ethnicity, and ancestry are not zero sum games, and it’s somewhat insulting to see them displayed as such.

To bring the point home, I’ve seen people get irritated when European people suggest that American traditions are incorrect.  When people from Norway, Sweden, or Germany criticize American Heathens and their methods of practice, many take offense.  Well, with very little manipulation, we could use the standards of Metagenetics and Meta-Folkism to declare that they are not only right but they have the authority to supersede American Heathen ideals.  After all, their connection to the native folkway and culture of their spiritual ancestors is closer and more defined, thus making their interpretations more meaningful by the standards that Metagenetics sets forth.

Imagine that the superiority of their European perspective was codified into the Meta-Folkist perspective in the same way that heritage is right now,  That the options of American Heathens mattered less because they were not natively European.  Our spirituality judged by a matter of where we were born.  Now realize that this is what Meta-Folkism does to other people; it passes judgement on their spirituality of others based on the circumstances of a person’s birth.  If our Heathen cousins over in Europe demanded that American Heathens follow their example based on a philosophy similar to Metagenetics, I seriously doubt the reaction would be very different from the reaction of American Heathens who have been hurt by the Meta-Folkish narrative.

The American Meta-Folkish position would be no different in scale or scope than a European version of the same.  Again, we have a version of separate but equal and again it leaves us with a bad taste in our mouths.

If Metagenetics is UPG, and everyone has the right to their own UPG, isn’t it hypocritical to call Metagenetics bad?  It feels like Metagenetics/Meta-Folkism is getting judged here more than other philosophies; there are people who won’t bat at an eye at Godspouses***, but will rip Meta-Folkists a new one at the drop of a hat!  Why does this philosophy receive so much bile when all we are doing is worshiping in the way that feels right to us?

Everyone is entitled to their own spiritual viewpoint.  This is where it gets sticky because Meta-Folkism, if followed, gives people a platform to deny people the spiritual paths of their choice.  When used extremely harshly or conservatively, it can become the patriot missile of UPGs, one which exists more as a means to deny another than to achieve a goal for one’s own self.  Again, we have to bring up the parallel of native Europeans being able to dictate the terms of our own religion to us; I wouldn’t feel comfortable with others trying to force an unwanted authority figure on my faith, and I feel not better about doing the same to others.

UPGs become problematic when they attempt to extend, even in theory, beyond the boundaries of one’s own religious practice.  Say what ever you like about Godspouses; none of them have come up to me and told me who should and shouldn’t be at a Heathen gathering.  There has been no attempt to force me into a spiritual marriage of any kind.  Their UPG is their own…and all of the ones I have encountered have given the same respect to mine that they wish for theirs.  The reason I, personally, don’t have an issue with Godspouses is pretty much the same reason I do have one with Meta-Folkism; the Godspouses make no rules for other Heathens, whereas many Meta-Folkists try to establish a standard by which someone may or may not be barred from Heathen spiritual practices.

vanessa-williams-2-pngThis judgmental, canonizing approach to the segregation of religion gets more troublesome when one realizes that Meta-Folkism doesn’t obey it’s own rules. Many of these Meta-Folkish judgements are not based on blood; in every case I’ve heard of or seen, they’ve been based on skin tone and/or apparent racial background.  People are rejected based on what ethnicity they appear to be, and not by the ethnic background they are.  If you are asking why this matters, consider the following example.

This woman is the famous actress, Vanessa Williams….who is 40% European.  Meanwhile, this man is a hardcore white supremacist who recently found out he has a non-zero amount of Sub-Saharan African heritage.  Craig Cobb, the man in question, doesn’t look like he has enough Africian heritage to suggest a non-Caucasian great-grandparent.Craig-Cobb-2783840  Yet science says he does…and it helps us to illustrate a very important point.

While I don’t think Vanessa Williams will be beating a path down to a Meta-Folkish kindred’s door anytime soon, her heritage ensures her a place at any Sumble that is held with those conceits in mind.  Craig Cobb shows us that a lack of apparent melanin doesn’t indicate a lack of non-Caucasian influence.  How many great-Grandparents, grandparents, uncles, and aunts would it take until his skin tone changed?  I don’t know…and neither does any one else.

And once you realize that, it makes it impossible to look at Metagenetics without suspicion; to meaningfully use it as a philosophy is impossible without a blood test.  Period.  Yet when someone is rejected as a “Legitimate Heathen” on the grounds of their heritage, there is no such test that explains that opinion.  Any rejection is being done based on appearance, which we’ve just shown can have absolutely nothing to do with anything.  If this is a spiritual mandate which calls to people so strongly, how can they denigrate that mandate by playing so fast and loose with the rules that would shape it?

Honestly, I don’t think there is a right answer to such a question.

The watch words of so many who believe in Meta-Folkism is that “I have the right to worship with whomever I choose.”  That’s completely true, but when there is a visible pattern of who is and is not acceptable to worship with there is no amount of philosophy, spirituality, or gnosis that’s going to magically make it something other than what it is.  It’s still bigotry.  It’s still racism.

It’s really that simple.


*A discussion on racism in Heathenry is somewhat difficult (bordering on impossible) without talking about the AFA.  I am not going to even imply that it’s entire membership is racist, or that it is a hate group in the pattern of the aforementioned Nazis and Klansmen.  Regardless, the AFA has written and promoted a lot of the material that makes up the bulk of the “soft-racist” narrative.  No document more so than Metagenetics, in my opinion.  That document was written by Stephen McNallen and it’s posted on the AFA website.  I do not make a habit of attacking people because I think it’s not constructive; those few times where I have has been because it’s been something I have been unable to ignore due to the actions in question.  So let me make this clear: this is not an attack on the AFA in general or Stephen McNallen in particular.   It is a dissent against the philosophies he has espoused, written, and defended, not a statement in condemnation of his humanity or his soul.  I’ve never met nor spoken with the man, so I can’t say what I feel about him as a person.  I know what I feel about some of his ideas, and that is what I’m addressing.  Period.  If anyone within the AFA leadership would like to sit down and have a chat, via phone, internet, or in person, I am more than willing to “talk across the isle” if you are.  You can message me here or on my Facebook.

**It would be far beyond the scope of this article to weigh each of the individual sources Metagenetics utilizes, and to judge the applicability of their use.  However, some of them are open to some very simple examination.  Dr. Ian Stevenson’s reincarnation research is still highly contested, and had accusations of confirmation bias and similar mistakes in scholarly rigor; the accusations persist into the present day.  Dr. Rhine’s PhD was not in any actual form of science which studied human anatomy or psychology, and his Botany degree could be considered completely separate from his theories and ideas…all of which fell outside the realm of peer reviewed science.  Timothy Leary’s influence on various elements of counter culture was vast, but the scope of his theories were more metaphysical and philosophical than scientific.  Perhaps in the future, should there be interest, we will look at them all in detail.  For the moment, this quick analysis of sources should give the reader a sense of how ill suited some of the material is for a scientific theory.

***To be clear, I’m not passing judgement on Godspousery or on those who practice it; I’ve seen this parallel cited before in arguments, and I suspect many others have as well.  I bring it up not to malign anyone, but rather just to inform the discussion; many seem to see ancestry as something they can touch, where as the Gods aren’t…and that disconnect leaves some baffled at how people will accept one idea but refuse the other. 

Change of Pace (also Time Travelers)

I don’t talk about my personal life on here for a lot for a number of reasons, but the foremost is that it isn’t why most of my reader’s are coming here.  I’m sure you are all glad that I’m happily married to my wonderful wife, that I have a wonderful seven-year old/2nd grade girl, a wonderful one-year old bouncing baby girl, and a wonderfully supportive family…but that awesome family wasn’t what I started writing about.  They definitely inspire me to follow me dreams and pursue my passions (of which writing is one), but…that’s just not the focus du jour here.  I got my readership from talking about Heathenry, spirituality, philosophy, ethics, and devotional practice.  As such, that’s what I try to focus on.

Awesome is hard to depict, but I think this historic marker for a time traveler comes close.

Awesome is hard to depict, but I think this historic marker for a time traveler comes close.

That being said, my life is about to become more busy, complex, and awesome…and I want to share that awesomeness.  It also effects that devotional meme I’ve been working on, so we’re sort of on topic here any how.

Wife* and I have had to live with my parents for about the last year.  That bouncing baby girl was a blessing of the unexpected variety, which had thrown a wrench into our long term plans; Wife ended up having to take a leave of absence from college due to the difficulty of the pregnancy, as Peanut was apparently a Thai Kick Boxer in a previous life.  Three or four months later, I had a knee injury that complicated our plans even more.  A worker’s compensation claim resulted, leaving us both out of job when that wasn’t what either of us wanted.  My parents had a Mother-Daughter house, so we moved the three and a half of us in that empty space.  It’s been cramped, but it’s been necessary.  My family has a tradition of looking out after each other, and it’s a tradition that my parents and extended family have followed above and beyond the call of duty.  In either case, Peanut was born, Wife started recovering, Munchkin started getting into the routines of her new school district, and we started rebuilding a long-term plan.

That plan was that Wife would work and I would stay home with the kids; her work record and schooling were both superior to mine, so she looked like she’d be the one likely to command the best wage.  While I am intelligent and articulate and generally awesome, my resume revealed a work history in the bowels of retail and food.  Those pay wages would cover the cost of gas, child care, and absolute nothing else, so that clearly wasn’t a step in the right direction.  So, instead, we were going to get her into a groove at her job, get me some night classes for things I already knew how to do so I could prove to potential employers that I knew how to do them, and that I’d get a decent job of my own.  We figured we’d be out on our own in a three to five years.  Not the most desired time frame, but one we could work with.

Well, than that plan imploded in the best way possible.  A friend of the family was trying to sell a house within walking distance of my parent’s house.  We had helped her flip the property and set it up, so we had gotten to know her and she had gotten to know us.  When she heard my wife had secured a job, she offered to work with us so that Wife and me could purchase it.  Very suddenly we had a house on the horizon, one we knew the complete history of, one being sold under fair market price, and was within walking distance of my children’s grandparents and every building within the school district.  Said children’s grandparents are willing to co-sign the mortgage so that we can get better rates, I’m a first time home buyer which means tax credits and better rates, and none of this requires us to change school districts again.  So all I need is a job…any job…and two paychecks later we’ll be able to close a mortgage.  Wife and I are, suddenly, time traveling two to four years in the future.  Without a time machine.

Though if you'd like to buy us a Tardis for a housewarming gift, we'd certainly would have a problem with that...

Though if you’d like to buy us a Tardis for a housewarming gift, we’d certainly wouldn’t have a problem with that…

That’s pretty much a grand slam right there**.

Needless to say, that means a job search has become priority one.  It’s also, quite possibly, priorities two through seven as well. Making sure the kids are being taken care of, looking for things to E-Bay to help subsidize the down payment, taking more freelance work so we can subsidize the down payment, looking for working appliances of various sorts, and a dozen other things are high on the list as well.  As a result, a lot of personal work has to slide to the back-burner***…and right now the devotional meme has got to be one of those things.  I’m boosting my devotional work in my day to day life and, for now, that will have to be enough.

That’s not to say the project is cancelled; it’s being postponed.  As soon as my schedule normalizes a bit, I’ll be announcing a start date.  It’ll probably go from daily to weekly however, as I’ll have a work schedule to contend with at that point as well.  In either case, for those wondering why all the radio silence?  That’s the reason.  It’s an awesome reason mind you, but it is still a very involved and time consuming reason.

In the mean time, I’ll be writing whatever I can whenever my schedule offers me the opportunity.  I have been pecking at some material here and there; I’ve just been too busy to polish it to the point where I’m happy enough with it to put it up for the world to see.

In either case, anyone wishing to send us good wishes/prayers/energy or what have you is more than welcome and invited to do so.  I’d also like to take a moment to thank the Gods, Goddess, my ancestors, and whatever wights have helped us here or will be helping us.  My thanks especially to Loki, who has help me keep my oars in the water, no matter how chaotic and turbulent that water.

I’d like to also thank any of my close, personal friends who don’t avoid me in the coming weeks in spite of the fact that I am very likely to ask for their help in moving. ;)


*I never use the names of my Wife and/or kids on here.  Aside of maintaining a veil of privacy for my family…well, there are a number of people in the Heathen and Pagan communities who have shown that they have some pretty fundamentalist perspective and poor impulse control.  The more insulation between them and my family, the better.  On here I call the baby “Peanut” and the seven year old “Munchkin”.  I call my wife, “Wife”.  Presume her to be amazing, awesome, and wise beyond her years.  Also, sexy.

**The reader may choose whether to view this as a Grand Slam in the sense of Baseball or in the sense of Denny’s breakfast menu.  Whichever one you like better.

***It was also my intention to take part in NaNoWriMo, which also looks highly unlikely due to the same circumstances.

Another day, another BNP behaving badly.

Harrison K. Hall:

Behold! Another BNP (who I had previously never heard of, honestly) whom I don’t give a crap about and never will!

Completely unacceptable. May the community take to shunning this fool, depriving his voracious ego of it’s diet of petty nonsense and immature posturing.

Originally posted on The House of Vines:

Following on the heels of Z. Budapest’s incendiary remarks, news is circulating that Christian Day, a prominent figure in the Salem, Mass. occult and pagan scene you may remember from his attempt to curse Charlie Sheen, has been sharing people’s private information in a public venue. When contacted by one of the people he “outed” who explained that among the many reasons she used a pseudonym was to elude a violent and threatening stalker, the “world’s best-known warlock” responded as follows:

christian_day_screenshot

Yes, you read that correctly. This guy actually said:

I hope your stalker has some fun with you.

As well as:

Oh, and by the way, if he rapes you please call out my name while he does so.

I am sickened beyond words. This vile creature’s ego is so bloated with hubris that he believes not only that speaking to an abuse-survivor in such a way is permissible but that…

View original 19 more words

A Foreward for a Devotional Project…

ForestAs I said when I was talking about the faux-issue of Marvel’s upcoming female Thor and her villainous, un-loresque mammary glands (as well as the blatant hypocrisy behind that selective outrage), I’ve been feeling burnt out lately.  It wasn’t just the murder of innocents at the hands of some fascist, Heathen fraud.  It wasn’t in reflecting on the cases of child molestation that came up within the pan-Pagan community, and ruminating over that while trying to look at my own daughters and not be afraid for them.  It wasn’t in the process of assisting in running a fund raiser*, helping out in a local pan-Pagan group with their May Faire event, or addressing a lack of professional ethics in how one of my fellow Heathen writers  choose to addess criticism.  It isn’t even the weight of constantly being exposed to some of the hateful bile that comes from the fascist and racist rhetoric passed off as Heathen tradition, nor watching the pointless police brutality of Ferguson, Missouri.

It has been all of it; all of these issues coming at us consecutively, and often concurrently as well.  Truth be told I was almost giddy when an extremely vocal faction of Heathenism lost their minds over a comic book character, because it gave me a nice and easy issue to talk about that didn’t effect me at the core of my being.  I could just unwind and produce some dialogue that cut to the heart of the matter without effort; my heart and faith weren’t getting hurt in the process.  Compound that with some of the material I have written but not yet posted, which has been going through more revisions that I can count due to the weight of the topic being discussed, and I’ve been pretty damn spent.  Some real life dilemmas and/or projects** have also gotten in the way, and it has resulted in me feeling extremely exhausted.

So, I decided to start recharging my batteries with a “devotional meme” project that I will publishing on my blog in the coming weeks.

I am going to be engaging in something similar to those “30 Days of Devotion” things that are going around.  I’ve fleshed out some of the questions I intend to use, and I’ve also taken inspiration from some of the memes of other bloggers.  My plan, however, is not to start with a script of thirty days worth of questions.  Instead, I’m looking to have about twenty question (or so) related to devotional work, philosophy, worship, and spirituality…and the rest will be questions I answer from any readers and/or peers who care to post them.  If I get less than thirty, I’ll still have the chance to charge my batteries and restore my focus.  If I end up with more than thirty, I’m just help to contribute to the dialogue surrounding devotional practices.  Either way, it’s a net positive.  I’m looking to help myself expand my spiritual horizons and, at the same time, get some respite from all of the horrific, soul-sucking news that’s going on in the realm of current events.  I want to re-immerse myself in my spirituality, and I don’t think it’s a coincidence that my devotional work took a downward spiral while I was so focused on the headlines.

So in the comments below, post some of your favorite devotional/worship/spirituality based questions.  Ones that you have struggled with, ones that you think are at the core of spirituality itself, or things that you just want to see be talked about more.  If you think of some after I start, feel free to post them as well…in any of the posts with “The Days of Devotion” as a category, for ease of organization.  If you are a blogger yourself, perhaps you can answer your own question as well.  Better yet, I’ll be posting the initial schedule a day or two before I begin and it’ll be adjusted with any needed updates.  So if you want to repeat this entire meme later or even participate in it along side of me, you’ll be able to do so.  Devotional rumination for it’s own sake, on a community based level, can be a potent force…and if I (or we) can help recharge the batteries of others along the way, all the better.

This suggestion is not limited to Northern European/Heathen based Polytheism either; if the project sounds worthwhile to you, and you are a devotionally engaged, Polytheist of any sort, feel free to join in!  There is nothing wrong with taking a moment to remind yourself that the world is still a potentially beautiful place in spite of all of the despicable nonsense that occurs around us.  I’ve been focusing a lot on the former lately, and I feel that it is high time to take a moment for some of the later.

More details to come, so stay tuned!


*On that note, I was directly connected with the event but I was probably the one who was least involved in the day to day affairs of it.  Those accolades go more to Josh Gamble and James Calico.  I tried to put the word out, I tried to put some of the words together, and it was out collective project…but those two did a lot to help bring that event together and they deserve the lion’s share of the credit.
**For those of you thinking of flipping a house, let me give you some advice: don’t.

About Robin Williams

220px-Robin_Williams_2011a_(2)I have never gotten the American obsession with celebrities, even though I was born and raised here.  Every once in a while someone passes where I at least understand why there is a strong fixation because he was someone who was trying to make the world a better place in some way.  Steve Irwin or George Harrison for example.  For the most part, however, I feel pretty confused when people grieve for the rich and famous.  I didn’t know them, I’m not going to pretend that my enjoyment of their work made me somehow closer to them, and that’s that.  I’ll feel an element of sadness for their friends and family, but that’s about it.

This was not the case with Robin Williams.  Not by a long shot.

He was to comedy what Nicola Tesla was for invention and inspiration.  What took me a decade or two to refine into a process where I can cleverly and humorously communicate my ideas was something he was born with.  It was a gift he pursued, seemingly every day of his life, for the entirety of his life.  He used that gift to bring joy and reprieve to others and, in the process, perhaps he was trying to find that joy for himself.  It seems he did not, and that’s why his death is more meaningful to me than it might otherwise have been.

In Robin Williams’ passing, my own mortality was reflected back at me.  I suspect that I am not alone in this.  When one of the most joyous, fun-loving, laughter-filled men that recorded history has ever borne witness to can be felled by his own depression, all of our lives seem all the more fragile.  I felt this all the more strongly because I understood, on some basic level, just exactly how it happened.  Humor has ever been my shield in times of difficulty, my sanctuary and safe harbor.  Seeing one of the greats take his own life and be failed by some of the same fortifications I myself have used is indescribable.  It’s an extremely sobering thing to witness, and it effected me in a way that took me a few days to sort through.

I saw a friend on Facebook ask why so many tears were being shed for an actor and comedian, but barely a though goes by for the various soldiers and military men who die out in the field every day.  Normally, I have a similar question in my head at the passing of a celebrity.  For me, at the very least, that’s now what has given rise to my own sadness.  I have been lucky in that my sadness has never been so deep, nor my shadows so dark, that I didn’t have an idea of how to overcome them.  Seeing a man like him pass in this way shows me what my life could have been.  Shows me what might have happened if things were different.

It also reminds me that one of the greatest comedians, a craft I myself attempt to practice in my own way, has just fallen.  It’s emotionally profound on a level that’s hard to articulate.

I don’t often ruminate on the dead.  At least on here.  I recognize those people who have passed on before me, related or not, and I attempt to pay them their respects.  For me, however, this is very much a silent recognition.  That’s a personal choice; I don’t feel that anyone who verbalizes there memorials is somehow “doing it wrong”.  I just feel that such recognitions are a private sort of thing, and I’ve felt no pressure or need to make it otherwise.  Maybe this is the start of breaking that trend.  Maybe this is just a moment where I need to grieve a little bit over the passing of a personal hero.  Maybe I just needed to express to the world that I understand.  I don’t know.  It was just in my heart and head, I felt I needed to say something.  So here it is.

In either case, I’d like to hail and salute the life and soul of Robin Williams.  From his work with Charities to his appearances in USO shows, he was a man who made his life’s work creating laughter.  From What Dreams May Come to Patch Adams, he helped people gain a touch of introspection.  It seems in death, he may even help some part of the world take a closer look at depression and suicide.  He was an inspiration to many, myself included, and he changed the world for the better.  I hail a man of brilliance, passion, and depth, whose life meant so much to so many.

May your soul find the destination it seeks, and you find the laughter you have certainly earned.

Important Announcement

Harrison K. Hall:

Attending the PLC this year wasn’t even an option for me, due to a number of factors…but I am happy to see that it came and to begging and did (from everything I’ve heard) very well.

If you too found of interest, you may also find this information worth looking at. I’m sad to see it postponed, but I have this feeling the extra time will end up being put to good use!

Looking forward to a point where attending will be both viable and reasonable me!

Originally posted on Polytheist Leadership Conference:

Hello everybody.

Since the Conference is likely to soon outgrow the Quality Inn we held it in the first year we’ve been in negotiations with a number of hotels in the area. Unfortunately June and July are wedding season here in the Hudson Valley, which means that even their discounted rates are an average of $40 to $70 a night higher than they are at other times of the year – which makes it prohibitively expensive for most members of our community. In fact we’ve been hearing from a lot of folks who are struggling financially but would like to attend – people who have important things to say and have made valuable contributions to their communities. We don’t want anyone to feel excluded, especially over something like money so we’re looking into several options.

1) We’re going to do some communal fundraising so that we can offer scholarships to help allay…

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